Monday, April 17, 2017

Namaste

Namaste.

Today I want to introduce you to Namaste, a Hindi word (from India) which means, I bow to the divine in you.

The word accompanies the action of joining one's palms and bowing to the person one is greeting.


As a Christian, I believe that we were all created in God's image and Namaste takes that thought a step further by acknowledging the presence of the divine in each of us. 

Namaste asserts that each of us, regardless of our financial status or ethnic and racial backgrounds or any of the million things that distinguish us, deserve one another's respect as human beings.

Even the vile deserve a Namaste, considering that we are not called to pass judgments on others.

Do you like the idea of saying Namaste?






14 comments:

  1. Only when I learned the meaning of Namaste did I realise what a powerful and gracious word this is. Such a pity that even in the land of its origin we still persist in saying Hi. Namaste dear Cynthia for an awesome word today.

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    1. Namaste, Suzy. I too didn't know the meaning of the word earlier. Once I discovered the meaning, I began to appreciate it.

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  2. Hi Cynthia - it is used quite a lot over here ... I've never quite got used to it - but I'm not usually in groups of people who use it. I hadn't fully understood its meaning ... so this is very helpful - thank you ... Hilary

    http://positiveletters.blogspot.co.uk/2017/04/n-is-for-notable-rare-breeds-natives.html

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    1. Hilary, at its simplest, it calls us all to appreciate one another.

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  3. I didn't know the exact meaning of this word, that I had hears sometimes. Thanks for the explanation!
    -----
    Eva - Mail Adventures

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    1. You are welcome, Eva. Thank you for dropping by.

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  4. Like the others, I hadn't known the precise definition - it really does shift one's perspective of the word, doesn't it?

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    1. Yes, it does. I've found that even when I don't say Namaste to people, just knowing the philosophy, helps me think well of others.

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  5. It is a word we use at the end of every yoga class, so thank you for explaining it.

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  6. I'd heard the word but didn't know what it meant. It sounds like a very good approach to life.

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  7. An Indian word! Finally!

    https://akprowling.wordpress.com/2017/04/17/n-is-for-new-notebooks/

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    1. Actually, there have been other Indian words that have featured in this series. B for Bohni, G for Gondogol and K for Karelu, specifically. But of course, Namaste is more universal when it comes to recognition.

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